Debugging tombstones with ndk-stack and addr2line

android

I really like to work with several components in a system including linux kernel or keep my emotions on userspace.

If you work with android and your are a real engineer, it is very difficult to resist the native support using Android NDK. If your software requires performance using graphic API like in OpenGL or if you need to access some specific information provided by some native library, the NDK fits for you.

However, bugs in native side sometimes takes time and usually it is not an easy and fast task. If you have the device and an easy way to reproduce the issue, it is ok but suppose you need to collect logs from remote users and the scenario is very difficult to reproduce. Some cases the users even see the crash visually but the system contains the logs blocking the approval of your software that must be completed to some costumer.. at this point the program/project managers team are “talking” in your ears… “fix it!”.

Working with Android, every time a process that runs on native side crashes, we have some small pieces of your stack in files called tombstones.

The tombstones are located at /data/tombstones as isolated files (one files represents one crash) or you can see them in your logcat Take a look in the adb shell:

root@android:/ # find . |grep tombs

./data/tombstones
./data/tombstones/tombstone_00
./data/tombstones/tombstone_01
root@android:/ #

The tombstone inform you about:

  1. Build fingerprint
  2. Crashed process and PIDs
  3. Terminated signal and fault address
  4. CPU registers
  5. Call stack
  6. Stack content of each call

I will not post a full tombstone here. Check the /data on your device and you will observe the 7 sessions mentioned above . Let’s go straight to the point.. how to debug the stack in tombstones files!

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Android Services: Recommendations when using AIDL for continuous service and low current drain impact

Last month a lot things happened.. I lost my dad, moved to another location .. thus, this blog was not the priority but was not forgotten.

This post is related to some issues I have observed in some Dalvik implementation and some recommendations is you want to create a service that must remains running all the time even after a device power on/off or reset.

Suppose you need to create a “light” service that must be:

1) starts when every time your devices boots.

2) contains very nice parcelable objects using aidl syntax sharing them thru IPC

3) is used to monitor something every X minutes but cannot impact the current drain.

4) the service must use the “uptime”, I mean, must reports “how long” is running

5) must be able to receive interruptions and reports them

A good application of this service could be an alarm central unit for your car. You could create this project using your old Android phone and transforming your old phone and hidden it in your car. You can also connect this old phone disassembling a 12V charging and connecting in some spot using the terminals of your battery.

So, let’s go to some mistakes.. see the list below:

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